Oamaru Opera House

Otago
All year round

A grand heritage building used by its community for all kinds of events. What a gem!

The beautiful Oamaru Opera House stands resplendent in historic Thames Street, Oamaru, New Zealand. Built over a century ago, the Oamaru Opera House is still the first choice for quality entertainment, in North Otago. The Opera House is open to the public 8:30am to 2pm weekdays. Feel free to come in and have a look around. All year round. Check online for times and contact for tours.

Cost?

Free

For more info visit:

Oamaru Opera House

ACCESSIBILITY

General

All spaces are wheelchair accessible. Please call 03 433 0770 if you require wheelchair seating at one of the performances.

Parking

For evening shows, you’ll usually be able to find ample street parking along Thames St or Wear St. The earlier you arrive, of course, the closer you can get! During the day there are generally spaces available along Thames St or in the carparks off Steward St.

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